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20110701
20110731
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of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arrests and a series of resignatns as fallout from the phone hacking scandal grows. with me john burns, ian katz, deputy he had tortd of the guardian and david karr of the new york city times and sh tyrangiel edito of newsweek. ian katz, what does this day whh rupert murdochcalled the humblest day of his life. what does it change and where do we go from here? >> well, it's not a day we learn an awful lot of significant things. if anything the clearest lesson is wendy dang has a formidable right hook but it was a day of quite striking theatre i think. for in who sits in this country the idea of rupert murdoch who two weeks ago was the most powerful person.country being hauled into parliament to answer questions is prett pretty extraordinary and we had the dialog of him saying it was the humblest day of his lif that w pretty striking. the interesting thing is he and james murdoch came in saying sorry and contrition if you lied but the message was we're sorry but it wasn't else, was someone else's fault and that's the bi
. the controversy has forced the head of scotland yard and his deputy to resign over their alleged links to a former murdoch executive. the scandal has reached the highest levels of the british government, with opposition leaders saying the prime minister himself has questions to answer about his close ties to the murdoch empire. >> but at the moment, he seems unable to provide the leadership the country needs. >> reporter: rebekah brooks is a friend and a neighbor to the prime minister. the pair have met repeatedly since cameron took office 14 months ago. the prime minister cut short a trip to africa and called for an emergency session of parliament. in a further twist to the scandal, police found one of the first whistleblowers about hacking dead in his home. police are calling sean hoare's death unexplained, but not suspicious. now the murdochs have been coached by the best pr company in the land. not just on what to say, but how to say it. this is all about damage limitation, taking care of business here, and making sure it doesn't spread to the murdoch empire in the u.s. betty? >> all right, so
of the world" also worked simultaneously, if you'll pardon the pun, as a translator for scotland yard. there was also somebody who was working both as the chief correspondent -- or chief reporter of the paper. as a police informant. so the -- there was almost no delineation at times between where news international finished around scland yard began. it was really extraordinary. >> rose: there was a headline,lm reuters saying, is britain more corrupt it thinks? >> i tnk we need to be careful before moving too far in that direction. this is not italy. this is certainly not a banana republic. what we've seen is an entangling of media and politicians and police, a kind of causeuasi new establishment with roles not being clearly enough defined. i think the second point to makeis that let's not forget britain has a very vibrant competitive press. and this story was exposed, not by a police inquire race, not by a parliamentary committee, but by a leading british newspaper "the guardian," helped a little bit by "the new york times," which crucially broke the story that broke the news internat
a big deal from afar but it's already left the prime minister scrambling, the head of scotland yard has resigned, and a skating parliamentary report accused rupert murdoch's company of deliberately trying to thwart a criminal investigation into the illegal activities of his newspaper here. >> isn't it time that we sent this non-tax paying murdoch back from whence he came? >> reporter: the prime minister didn't have to. murdoch boarded his private jet to fly home to the u.s. no doubt happy to leave london and all the turbulence behind. jeffrey cough rkofman, abc news loloon. >> certainly not over yet though as this continues to grow and we're investigating issues here. people, perhaps 9/11 victims, who might have had their cell phones hacked. >> it's scary. judging by the atmosphere there. and the number two, headlines in australia this morning, now that country may be stepping into the investigation to see if phone hacking occurred on their turf. so this thing's snowballing out of control. >> that's for sure. agreed. although you can hop in your private jet and head home. >> slithering
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)